thirty-one.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (1818)

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A ship rescues a man drifting on ice in the Arctic. The captain writes home to his sister to tell her the strange tale of the man named Frankenstein. Frankenstein claims that he gave life to a horrible manlike monster who killed several of his family members because he refused to make a mate to the monster.
I have spent my whole life believing that the monster was named Frankenstein and now I know the truth. It took me forever to read the book, probably because I didn’t find the narrative of Frankenstein interesting at all until the first murder happened. And I finally started to enjoy the story when the monster started to speak. His story was far more interesting than Frankenstein’s, although I must question the way he learnt to read and write without being discovered, considering his size and all. Frankenstein certainly didn’t get any sympathy from me, but neither did the monster.
I haven’t seen any film adaptions of Frankenstein yet, and I doubt I will ever dare to do it on my own either as I imagine them being scarier than the book.

sixteen.

De døde by Vidar Sundstøl (2009)


This is the second book in the Minnesota trilogy, and it is really hard to write a review of it without spoiling the first book.

Lance Hansen is out hunting deer with his brother, Andy, for the weekend. The relationship between the brothers has never been easy and the only thing they really do together is this annual hunt. But this time, the hunt turns into a paranoia and a struggle between life and death.

I enjoyed this book more than the first. Probably because it was so thrilling and the only thing I didn’t like about it was the lenght – 175 pages is way too short. The third book in the trilogy is out in May, and I can’t wait to find out what happens in the end.

fifty-five.

Cold Earth by Sarah Moss (2009)


Six archaeologists are on Greenland trying to solve the mystery of why the Vikings disappeared from the island. An outbreak of a pandemic disease is spreading panic at the time of their departure to Greenland. As the dig is starting to uncover bodies, Nina is having nightmares about dead Greenlanders in the camp. And then the rest of the archaeologists are sensing them too.

This book frightened me. Isolated camp, ghosts and a pandemic. I couldn’t put it away and even when I did for a few minutes, it was always in my mind. And even now when I have finished it and the daylight is back, I still have a nervous feeling. Or more like an Arctic chill. I’m really glad I was attracted to the shiny cover at the airport in Trondheim.

I really liked the letter as a writing style, mainly because it took a long time before I realised it was written as letters. And this one of the few books where I’m satisfied that you never get all the facts, you have to guess what happened. What really happened to the Greenlanders, anyway?

Dear Hollywood; please make a brilliant film out of this book.